iTableAmount for Mac FAQs:

What are the system requirements for being able to use iTableAmount for Mac?

To use iTableAmount for Mac you must have a Mac with a 64-bit Intel processor, and you must be running at least Mac OS X 10.8.x.

How can I purchase a license for iTableAmount for Mac, and how much does it cost?

iTableAmount for Mac is available through the Mac App Store. The costs of a license for iTableAmount for Mac is only $3.99. There are no hidden or “In App Purchase” costs.

Does a license for iTableAmount for Mac allow me to use it on more then one computer?

Yes. Apps purchase through the Mac App Store can be installed on up to 5 Mac computers (meeting the system requirements set out above) that are set up to use the same Apple ID the App was purchased with.

Can I open the files I create and save with iTableAmount for Mac on my iPhone or iPad?

Yes, iTableAmount for Mac files can be opened, edited, and saved on any capable iPhone or iPad provided you have iTableAmount for iOS installed on the iPhone or iPad (purchased separately from the App Store for $2.99).

I am using Mac OS X 10.8.x (Mountain Lion) and I still can’t see where to save documents to, or open documents from, iCloud?

In order to be able to save documents to, and open documents from, iCloud users must have the “Documents & Data” option turned on (checked) in the iCloud System Preferences Panel. To check if it is turned on open the System Preferences (Apple->System Preferences…), and choose the “iCloud” panel which is under the “Internet & Wireless category.”

What version of the Child Support Tables does iTableAmount for Mac use?

iTableAmount uses the current Child Support “Tables” that came into force on January 1, 2012. These tables will likely be in force for 5 years (Previous versions of the Tables came into force in 1997 and 2006).

Can I set the default values for new files I create?

Yes. Using the App Preferences (accessed by the iTableAmount->Preferences… Menu or the Preferences button in the Tool Bar) default values for the “Guideline Income”, “Province Resides In”, “Number of Children”, “Window Mode”, and “Parent Labels” can be set for new files created.

WARNING: The FAQs below relate to the Canadian Child Support Guidelines. The information provided is not intended to be legal advice and is provided for informational purposes only. Only qualified lawyers can provide legal advice based on the lawyer knowing all of the circumstances of the person seeking the advice. It is recommended that all persons obtain legal advice from a qualified lawyer to determine their rights and responsibilities in relation to the receipt, or payment of, child support.

What are the "Canadian Child Support Guidelines"?

The Canadian Child Support Guidelines (CCSG) is a "Regulation" under the Canadian Divorce Act, that was first passed by the Government of Canada in 1997. It establishes a set of rules and "Tables" (6 for each Province and Territory) for calculating the amount of Child Support parents should receive from, or pay to, each other. The CCSG have undergone numerous changes since they were first passed into law, including updates to the Tables that came into effect in 2006 and most recently January 1, 2012.

What is a person's “Guideline Income” under the CCSG and how is it calculated?

Guideline Income is the term used in the CCSG to refer to a parent's income for the purposes of applying the Canadian Child Support Guidelines, including calculating the "Table Amount" payable. It is usually (but not always) calculated using the person's last Income Tax Return. The starting point is the person's "Total Income", as set out in the person's T1 Tax Return (i.e. Line 150), and from there making adjustments to that amount based on the rules set out in the CCSG. Examples of the adjustments incude: 1) deducting Union Dues [Line 212 on a persons T1]; 2) deducting Social Assistance income that is not attributed to the parent (i.e. the amount received for children); and 3) doubling the amount of income from Dividends from Canadian Corporations [Line 120 on a persons T1)].
Again, readers should consult a lawyer for advice in determining all matters under the CCSG, including what their Guideline Income should be.

What is "Shared Custody" and how does it effect the amount of Child Support payable?

Shared Custody is the term used to describe a parenting arrangment where the child or children are in the care of both parents at least 40% of the time. In Shared Custody situations the final amount of child support payable is determined by caclulating the child support amount that would be payable by each parent to the other, with the difference being payable to the parent who would pay the lesser amount to the other.

What is "Spilt Custody" and how does it effect the amount of Child Support payable?

Split Custody is the term used to describe a parenting arrangment where one child (or children) of the relationship live with one of the parents and another child (or children) of the relationship live with the other parent. In Split Custody situations the final amount of child support payable is also determined by caclulating the child support amount that would be payable by each parent to the other, with the difference being payable to the parent who would pay the lesser amount to the other.